Exchanges in the media

After a travel warning issued by the U.S. Department of State urged “U.S. citizens to defer travel to Egypt” and instructed “U.S. citizens living in Egypt to depart…because of the continuing political and social unrest,” many public and private programs, including university study abroad groups, have decided to evacuate their participants from Egypt. Below is a list of articles detailing the evacuation of international exchange participants:

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Many Chinese students who study abroad in the U.S. use the experience to explore personal freedoms, unlike their predecessors who pursued political freedoms, The Atlantic reports.

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The rate of graduation for international students “[has] a marked impact on estimated graduation rates” and can mask the actual graduation rates within a country, a recent University World News articles states, citing the findings from the recent OECD Education at a Glance report.

The level of higher education exchanges between the U.S. and Latin America has been increasing, marking a “strategic priority for the United States,” a recent blog post on the Chronicle of Higher Education website writes, noting that these exchanges are “mutually beneficial” for all nations involved.

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More U.S. colleges and universities are helping finance study abroad experiences for low-income students, a trend that has increased the U.S. study abroad rate, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports.

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The UK’s tightening of student visa regulations not only encourages more students to study in the U.S. and in Canada, but could also cause long-term damage to UK universities and cost the country £2.4 billion over the next decade, the Guardian reports.

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In response to the current political unrest and protests held in Turkey, many U.S. universities are ending their study abroad programs or are arranging alternative plans for their students currently on programs in the country, reports USA Today.

As the Alliance reported last week, a Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) report revealed that international graduate school applications only grew by one per cent this year. A major factor in this slowing rate is a five per cent decline in applications from China, which had seen double-digit growth for the previous few years.

The decreasing number of international graduate student applications to U.S. campuses may cause the international education “bubble” to pop, potentially harming the U.S. academic and knowledge communities, according to a blog post published in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The number of applications from prospective international students to U.S. graduate schools grew a mere 1 per cent in 2013, marking the smallest growth in these applications over the last eight years, a new Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) report shows. For comparison, the number of international grad school applications rose 9 per cent in 2012, and 11 per cent in 2011.

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